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Friday, February 23, 2018

Girl-Pearls & Man-Tools?!

Hey peeps. Most of my readers know I am a history geek. But I'm also a Pinterest geek. I'll be sharing a few favorite pins of the week. The visual reminders can be scenes or things that give me story ideas, or help with brain-storming fiction. But often, they are just plain fun.

This week's pin is what I'm terming girl-pearls--the chatelaine. What's a chatelaine? It's the girl version of a man-tool!


Like the Swiss Army knife or Leatherman (not that girls can't use it!), the chatelaine was worn at the waist for easy access during work. This lady's picture is titled "the nurse's chatelaine"--she may have used the scissors to cut off old bandages, a pencil to make notes on the mini clipboard, some smelling salts to revive the faint, and finally a little pillbox to dispense medications when needed. This one is elaborate and makes me glad nurses have pockets in their scrubs now! When we were in Maine this summer, my husband and I had a blast window shopping the antique stores. I found another very elaborate chatelaine in the window:


The tag on this one says it's for sale for $1,295.00--so you know why I didn't get it!! It also says, it's sterling silver, and includes a thimble, thimble case, pin cushion, patch box, and stamp box. Very cool! These are examples of 19th century ones. They were often worn by the wealthy housekeeper, might have included keychains, and was somewhat a status symbol showing the matron of the home who held sway over her domaine.

If a married woman moved to the home of her husband, under the roof of her mother-in-law, her mother-in-law would remain the keeper of the keys. But if her mother-in-law became widowed, the keys were passed to the daughter-in-law because her son became the head of the household. I would attempt to explain the complexities of mother-in-law relationships here, but you can imagine! And if there were no women in the home, the housekeeper then would hold the keys of the house. And if this housekeeper was also secretly a mistress, you can imagine that conundrum! I find it very interesting that Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie in their book, America's First Daughter about Thomas Jefferson's daughter, have a scene depicting this interesting passing of power and keys from one woman to another (no spoilers!!). 


So you see, a little Pinterest pin can spin my brain to lots of interesting story threads. What if the keys were lost, hidden, kept by the wrong woman? What might she kept locked away? What secrets did the keeper of the keys hold?

Readers:
Have you heard of Chatelaines before?
Where does this pin take you for a story idea?
Do you keep girl-tools hidden in your kitchen cupboards so no one else will pirate them when you need them? Ha! I do!
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Blog post by Anne Love-
Writer of Historical Romance inspired by her family roots. 
Nurse Practitioner by day. 
Wife, mother, writer by night. 
Coffee drinker--any time.
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Old posts at: Coffee Cups & Camisoles

Monday, February 19, 2018

Monday's Devo: The Source

Anne here. It's Monday. Again.
Last week I talked on my vlog post about primary sources. In research it's critical to prove the veracity of a story to make sure you go to the most primary sources. This can be directly to a person, or a written document, such as a diary, a letter, or legal document.


In court cases, witnessed are called to testify. Testimony helps build a story and fill in the blanks about what needs to be known, seen, understood about the truth.


I tend to sit up straighter, tune my ear in, and listen more carefully when I hear a word more than two or three times in the same week. This week, it was primary source.


It was my turn to teach Sunday School since we all take turns each week. When I flipped to the opening chapters of Galatians, low and behold Paul is writing them that his transformation was not of man, but due to a direct encounter with Jesus on the road to Damascus.

It slapped me in the face. Paul is trying to prove his story to the Galatians. He might as well be on the witness stand, in a court room, on trial.

You know all those great crime shows you've watched over the years?
Bull is a current popular one. And what about A Few Good Men?
You know that moment when the lawyer turns the corner, when he "gets" the testimony to prove point. It's the "Ah-Hah!" moment when you want to yell, "Hah!! Got him!" Proof. Beyond doubt.
Right?


What is that point, the ah-hah moment for Paul when he's writing his account?
Galatians 1: 12 (Amplified Version) "For indeed I did not receive it form man, nor was I taught it through a direct revelation of Jesus Christ."
Ah-hah! Direct Source. Jesus. Not a man. Not the Law of Judaism. Not a Jew. Or Gentile.


Then I realize something I would have passed over before. After his direct encounter, he reports that he didn't immediately consult anyone, or go to Jerusalem--in other words, he didn't post a selfie blog to tell he world what happened. Nope. So where did he go?

He went to Arabia. Some sources say--it was Mount Sinai.
Wait. Mt. Sinai? Isn't that where Moses went to be in the presence of God? To directly talk to Him?
Hmmm. Direct source. He spent three years with the Direct Source.
Apparently God had some additional revelation and transformation to do in Paul before anyone in Jerusalem would believe the truth about his story....?
He needed to show them he'd been in the presence of the One Source. Jesus.
Otherwise, don't you suppose they would have just maybe, say, stoned him for killing Stephen?
At the very least they wouldn't have easily believed him.

Now, of course, we can't dictate when God the Almighty wants to just shoot a beam of light onto our paths of darkness and speak audibly to us like happened to Paul on the road to Damascus.

But. We can go the the mountain.
We can go to the source.
We have access through His Spirit
To the Primary Source.


Have you been the Mountain lately?
Have you been with the One?
Have you spent some time with the One who wants to rock your testimony? Your Story?
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Blog post by Anne Love-
Writer of Historical Romance inspired by her family roots. 
Nurse Practitioner by day. 
Wife, mother, writer by night. 
Coffee drinker--any time.
Find me on:Facebook
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Old posts at: Coffee Cups & Camisoles

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Book Report & Give Away: The Lacemaker by Laura Frantz

Most of you know that Laura is one of my favorite authors. She introduced me to the Colonial era in a way that captured my attention. That time in history holds complex allegiances and The Lacemaker is no exception to the shifting loyalties that rippled through our history.

Lady Elisabeth "Liberty" Lawson, daughter of Virginia Colony's British lieutenant governor, expects nothing more than wealth and family social status to be transferred upon her when she weds a landed gentleman. Never mind that she doesn't love him, and he's a snake. Her own dreams are of little impact to the life she might live--or so she thought.

When unrest in the colony sends ruling British on the run,  Williamsburg becomes a hub of volatile revolutionary activity with  Liberty caught in the center with her finance's cousin, Noble Rynallt. With his passion for freedom and her ties to the Crown, Liberty is faced with a decision.

Will the choice that gives her a bright future become the one that places her in the greatest danger and suspect?

<No Spoilers!> Frantz's story is set in May 1775, with a historically well-known character playing a secondary role. Lord Dunmore is known to colonial historians for his role in what is called "Lord Dunmore's War" of 1774 when he urged Virginia rulers to wage war against the Indian nations over land rights to hunt the lands south of the Ohio river in present day West Virginia, Southwestern Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. Because of Lord Dunmore's military campaign, the Indian nations lost hunting rights to those lands and became disgruntled. Unable to agree over the treaties with the British, when the colonies began the Revolution, the Indians used the unrest for their advantages. So when you read Frantz's wonderful story, now you have some context.

And about the LACE?! Is there anything more beautifully feminine through the centuries? Lace in the colonial era was a status symbol for women. The technique is shown here:


You might want to hop over the Washington's Mount Vernon website to hear more about Martha Washington's lace: Martha's Lace

I think I'll have to put Mount Vernon and Colonial Williamsburg on my bucket list!!
I'm not sure I own any lace, but if I did, I'd like it to be Irish Lace curtains for my dining room windows. Anyone have a wish list?

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Readers: (comment for a chance for free copy!) 
Have you been to Williamsburg or Mount Vernon?
What is your favorite Frantz novel?
How many of you learned to sew from your mothers, or wish you did?

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Blog post by Anne Love-
Writer of Historical Romance inspired by her family roots. 
Nurse Practitioner by day. 
Wife, mother, writer by night. 
Coffee drinker--any time.
Find me on:Facebook
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Find me on: Twitter
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Old posts at: Coffee Cups & Camisoles

Monday, February 12, 2018

Vlogging it Up!


Hey readers! I'm mixing it up a bit by trying a vlog-post this week. I'll take you along on some research fun I've had today, digging through Revolutionary War records for my 6x's great uncle on my paternal side. I've been looking at the 1780's as our ancestors migrated over the mountains to settle Kentucky and Indiana. What I found today will give us a peek back in time to hear the actual words of my great uncle, Adam Motherall.




Pension Application for Adam Motherall: stating he was in the service of General George Rogers Clark! In case you didn't know who this general is the older brother of William of the well known Rogers & Clark expeditions. George is known as the highest ranking officer in the Northwest Territory during the Revolutionary War and often credited for making way for the treaty with Paris in 1783 that ceded the Northwest Territory to the United States.


There are eleven pages of handwritten testimony on Adam's behalf, including his original signature. Upon completion of his testimony, he was indeed granted a pension for his years of service, of which he testified he'd never received "one cent" for until his pension was granted.

Until that day, is payment was simply freedom.
The cost though, I'm sure, was precious and dear.
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Blog post by Anne Love-
Writer of Historical Romance inspired by her family roots. 
Nurse Practitioner by day. 
Wife, mother, writer by night. 
Coffee drinker--any time.
Find me on:Facebook
Find me on: Pinterest
Find me on: Goodreads
Find me on: Twitter
Find me on: Instagram
Old posts at: Coffee Cups & Camisoles

Book Give-Away: The Curse of Misty Wayfair by Jaime Jo Wright

Anne here. Many of you know that Jaime and I launched a blog together six years ago with dreams and aspirations to support the writing world...